KUSM-W Volunteer Faculty/Preceptor
The site dedicated to assisting the nearly 1,000 KUSM-W community teachers
The University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita

Strategies for Teaching in a Busy Practice

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What are the best teaching strategies or methods to use in patient care situations?

The key to successful teaching is involving the student in patient care. Our best teachers describe themselves as “coaches” and find that teaching skills are very similar to patient care skills. They use a wide range of teaching techniques. There is no single “right way” to teach but most daily teaching uses a combination of

No single strategy is ideal, each has advantages and drawbacks and all depend on continuous constructive feedback to the student. The optimal teaching strategy depends on the interaction of the student, the teacher, and the situation. In practice the choice of strategy is made so quickly that it is almost instinctive. There is seldom time to ruminate on the optimal teaching technique for a given situation!

Depending on your natural learning and teaching styles, certain teaching strategies are more comfortable and hence used more frequently than others in your practice. Using a mixture of methods makes teaching more enjoyable and is probably more effective. Each strategy can be learned and practiced.

 

key points

triangle Most teaching skills are similar or identical to skills required for patient care

triangle You can draw on both positive and negative experiences in your own education

triangle As residents and students are adult learners, the role is more similar to coaching than traditional classroom teaching.

Busy clinicians are usually proficient in at least four of the six strategies listed above. As you go through the modules, you will probably recognize things you already do in teaching. Our aims are to validate many of your current teaching practices and to provide new information you can incorporate into teaching. By combining medical education theory with practical experience, we hope to enhance your confidence as an educator and contribute to teaching being an enjoyable and worthwhile part of your practice.

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Site development made possible in part by an HRSA grant.

Introduction | Getting ready to teach | Orienting students
Strategies for teaching in a busy practice | The one-minute preceptor | Using active observation
Teaching Clinical Skills | Feedback | Giving Short Talks on the Run
Teaching at the bedside | Evidence-based medicine | Evaluating learners
The unwritten curriculum | When things go wrong | Giving talks and lectures
PDA Resources for Teaching | FAQs about community based teaching

Introduction
Getting ready to teach
Orienting students
 starting well

Strategies for teaching in
 a busy practice

The one-minute preceptor
 tools for effective teaching
 in limited time

Using active observation
 not just show and tell

Teaching Clinical Skills
 beyond "see one, do one"

Feedback
 the under used "power tool"

Giving Short Talks on the Run
 short focused didactics that are
 more powerful than lectures

Teaching at the bedside
 and on hospital rounds

Evidence-based medicine
Evaluating learners
The unwritten curriculum
When things go wrong
Giving talks and lectures
PDA Resources for Teaching
FAQs about community
 based teaching